Snowdon Walk, Snowdonia National Park, North Wales

The sun has continued to shine here in North Wales and, indeed, across the rest of the UK I believe. So yesterday it was the perfect day to take on Wales’ highest peak at 1,085m or 3,560ft. I decided to do it via the Watkin Path, so called because it was created by Sir Edward Watkin and was Britain’s first designated footpath. It was opened by the then Prime Minister, William Gladstone, in 1892 and there is a plaque on a large rock to commemorate the occasion. (See pic 8).

Snowdon (or Yr Wyddfa in Welsh) is reputed to be Britain’s most walked mountain and you can see why when, on a fine day like yesterday, the hoards ascend (some via the train to the top) and queue very politely to capture that all important summit photo. I’ve been to the very top before, on a much quieter day thankfully, so I was content to take pictures from just below the summit cairn.

To make the walk into a loop, I descended via the South Ridge or Bwlch Main, which I thought would be quite precipitous, but in the event was just a bit rocky underfoot. The path eventually turned to the left to meet up again with the Watkin Path, just below Gladstone’s rock and just above the Waterfalls, where many people were having picnics or taking advantage of the “fairy pools” below.

14 thoughts on “Snowdon Walk, Snowdonia National Park, North Wales

  1. Introvert here, so I was surprised to see the crowd at the summit! It makes sense when you explained it, but still… seems out of place in that wide, wild open place to then see a pretty heft queue!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it is rather weird – mainly though because it’s such an orderly queue (-a classsic British trait)! It’s also not so surprising when you know that there is a train to the top (and down again obviously). But many (too many in fact) do the trek in tee shirts and trainers or even flip-flops and get caught out by the rocky path (if not low cloud when it comes in).

      Liked by 1 person

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